Reaching out to others! Free & Open Source Software, Kannada, L10n, L18n Data Science, Cloud Computing & more…

Karmic open for development

As the Ubuntu user community celebrates the release of Jaunty Jackalope (Ubuntu 9.04), developers fasten their belts to get on with Karmic Koala (Ubuntu 9.10). Mark Shuttleworth want to over take Apple’s Mac. To learn more about Ubuntu future plans read Marks interview.

Martin Pitt
announces Karmic to be open for development and its release schedule on list.

This release is not meant for immediate use. This relase will be available for uses in coming Octobar. Are you a techie, then start contributing to this up-coming distro.

Configure Skype on Ubuntu 9.04 “Jaunty Jackalope”

I just tried fixing my Skype on Ubuntu 9.04 “Jaunty Jackalope” (Beta). I could get it configured just fine in seconds without much headache this time. www.pulseaudio.org did not really bug me this time.

Here is my skype sound preference on DELL XPS M1210 running on Ubuntu 9.04 “Jaunty Jackalope”.

skype_sound_preference

I’m using internal Mic which comes attached with the in-built camera.Video config also works out-of-box as of now.

Nice calling skype.

Jaunty – Elegant Notifications

If any new user has to fall in love with Operating system, he should feel good about its looks and usability. I think Ubuntu future plans are pretty well tuned to match this end user requirement. Here are some Pop-up notifications which will really catche your eyes. I’m  using Jaunty  (Ubuntu 9.04) while its living it’s Alpha release days.

brightnesscontroller1

Brightness

device_notification

USB Disk removal notice

gprs

Here you go! You’re now connected to Wifi

powerinformation

How long you’re gonna be alive? Power Information..

volumecontroller

Hey, can you hear me? Volume controller.. Works with my DELL panel buttons too

wireless

I’m connected on the ground! Are you with me on the network? My Address is eth0

Watch out for more eyecandy on my upcoming posts..

Clean cruft with Janitor

Many of you might be wondering if we could get our Ubuntu system cleaned quickly and easily. If you’re using update-manager for installing the updates, it automatically cleans the downloaded packages along with unsupported dependencies etc. But this won’t remove many other cruft which I’m mentioning here ie. old kernel versions, transitional packages, unnecessary packages etc. How do we get these things cleaned safely?

Right, there must be some tool called system-cleaner and I just found exactly the same. CleanupCruft or Computer Janitor earlier known as System Cleaner.  It’s now available on Ubuntu 9.04 Alpha5 (Jaunty Jackalope) under System -> Admnistration menu.

computer_janitor

Its quite simple, easy to use and a handy tool. Try it today…

Ubuntu 9.10: Karmic Koala

While we test the Alpha releases of Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty Jackalope, Mark Shuttleworth announces the code name for Ubuntu 9.10 as “Karmic Koala” to the developers community in the mailing list.

While 9.04 brings in lots of new goodies to Ubuntu lovers, 9.10 dreams about making it beautiful. I even found a cool comic asking why don’t we move to Karmic Koala directly ;) .  Server edition of Ubuntu 9.10 talks about futurology of cloud computing. More interesting developments. I’m already happy about many things in Ubuntu 9.04 and egarly waiting for Cool Karmic Koala.

Mark on Ubuntu Koala Desktop:

The desktop will have a designer’s fingerprints all over it – we’re now beginning the serious push to a new look. Brown has served us well but the Koala is considering other options. Come to UDS for a preview of the whole new look.

On Ubuntu Koala Server:

A good Koala knows how to see the wood for the trees, even when her head is in the clouds. Ubuntu aims to keep free software at the forefront of cloud computing by embracing the API’s of Amazon EC2, and making it easy for anybody to setup their own cloud using entirely open tools.

If that sounds rather open and nebulous, then we’ve hit the sweet spot for cloud computing futurology. Let me invite you to join the server team at UDS in Barcelona, when they’ll be defining the exact set of features to ship in October

Motoming A1200: Connecting to Airtel GPRS on Ubuntu

504_master-black-fn185k-50m

At last I’m successfully connected to net via my Motorola Motoming A1200 using Airtel GPRS connection  on Ubuntu (I’m using Ubuntu Jaunty Jackalope ie 9.04 Alpha).

Here is a quick run through for setting up GPRS connection on Ubuntu:

First configure pppd default ip address to which you want the GPRS connection to be binded. This can be done by editing /etc/ppp/options file. Add the following line to it via vi or other file editing tool.

/etc/ppp/options:

:192.168.0.254

Now, make the required changes to /etc/wvdial.conf as mentioned below.

PS: You can get this file generated by connecting the phone via usb and then running sudo wvdialconf /etc/wvdial.conf on console. Ensure that USB mode is set to “Modem

[Dialer Defaults]
Init1 = ATZ
Init2 = AT&FE0V1&C1S0=0
Init3 = AT+CGDCONT=1,”IP”,”airtelgprs.com”
Modem Type = USB Modem
ISDN = 0
Phone = *99***2#
New PPPD = yes
Modem = /dev/ttyACM0
Username = airtel
Password = airtel
Baud = 460800
Idle Seconds = 3000
Auto DNS = 1
Stupid Mode = 1
Dial Command = ATD
Ask Password = 0
FlowControl = NOFLOW

Once all this is done, you’re ready to get online by typing the following command.

sudo wvdial

Now, start browsing the net. Let me know if you get to face any other trouble.

Here is the output:

techfiz:~# wvdial
–> WvDial: Internet dialer version 1.60
–> Cannot get information for serial port.
–> Initializing modem.
–> Sending: ATZ
ATZ
OK
–> Sending: AT&FE0V1&C1S0=0
AT&FE0V1&C1S0=0
OK
–> Sending: AT+CGDCONT=1,”IP”,”airtelgprs.com”
OK
–> Modem initialized.
–> Idle Seconds = 3000, disabling automatic reconnect.
–> Sending: ATD*99***2#
–> Waiting for carrier.
CONNECT
–> Carrier detected.  Starting PPP immediately.
–> Starting pppd at Wed Feb 25 14:01:47 2009
–> Pid of pppd: 8595
–> Using interface ppp0
–> pppd: [08][18]�[08]
–> pppd: [08][18]�[08]
–> pppd: [08][18]�[08]
–> pppd: [08][18]�[08]
–> pppd: [08][18]�[08]
–> pppd: [08][18]�[08]
–> local  IP address 117.97.93.18
–> pppd: [08][18]�[08]
–> remote IP address 192.168.0.254
–> pppd: [08][18]�[08]
–> primary   DNS address 202.56.250.5
–> pppd: [08][18]�[08]
–> secondary DNS address 202.56.250.6
–> pppd: [08][18]�[08]

Thanks to Dirk Hohndel for pointing me to the right direction.